Wednesday February 29


Adam Bartos: Never Before Exhibited Color Photographs

Opening Reception
Gitterman Gallery
170 East 75th Street (Map it)
6-8 PM

This exhibition includes both work Adam Bartos made in North and East Africa and Mexico in the early 1980s and recent photographs made in Long Island. Bartos’ interest in the 19th century travel work of Samuel Bourne, Robert MacPherson, and others, led him to Egypt, Kenya, and Mexico with a large format camera and color film. His images are thoroughly modern, yet their energy is inspired by the lucid depiction of form and light that the earlier photographers achieved.  As Geoff Dyer notes in the introduction to Bartos’ book Boulevard: "his pictures are like self-portraits of the things in them."  read more...

Thursday March 1


George Platt Lynes

Opening Reception
Steven Kasher Gallery
521 West 23d Street (Map it)
6-8 PM

This exhibition of over 40 vintage prints includes major examples of nudes, portraits, ballet pictures and surreal images photographed by this American master between 1933 and 1953. Extraordinarily, Lynes celebrated homosexuality in an era of harsh repression. Lynes' nudes embody an intimacy unequaled in their time. They are the template and inspiration for the modern homoerotic photograph; Mapplethorpe, Weber and Ritts are unthinkable without Lynes. Lynes' portraits for Vogue and Bazaar remain amongst the most elegant in the modern canon. He is celebrated for the grace and inventiveness of the ballet images he made with George Balanchine, and for the psychological intensity of his surrealist images.  read more...

SPAR: Photographs from Cuba by Paul Meleschnig

Opening Reception
Steven Kasher Gallery
521 West 23d Street (Map it)
6-8 PM

In his recurring travels to Cuba between 1997 and 2009, Meleschnig captured boxers and their everyday life of physical training. In this exhibition of over twenty gelatin silver prints, gymnasium, ring and street collectively unfold the lives of young men in a sort of visual poem. Through Spar we are offered a viewpoint from which to contemplate contemporary Cuban life. There is an unveiling of restless, frustrated, and  resilient youths exercising their voice and fist.  read more...


Michal Ronnen Safdie: Sunday Tuesday Thursday
Opening Reception
Andrea Meislin Gallery
526 West 26th Street, Suite 214 (Map it)
6-8 PM

Ronnen Safdie's new body of work, Sunday Tuesday Thursday, portrays Orthodox women and children at a beach in Israel, north of Tel Aviv. The title of the exhibition refers to the days in which this particular beach is open to use by Orthodox women – on the other days it is exclusively male territory. A portrait emerges through Ronnen Safdie's photographic inquiry of a culture that most viewers have never seen before. Ronnen Safdie is able to use her access to this world to capture the touching and surprising individual moments occurring within the larger whole.  read more...

Mark Ruwedel: Records
Opening Reception
Yossi Milo Gallery
245 10th Avenue, between 24th and 25th Streets (Map it)
6-8 PM

The exhibition will present the artist’s recent projects in the western United States, focusing on the collision of promise and reality. The photographs, primarily of homes and landscapes, were made in the desert regions surrounding Los Angeles, from the western Mojave Desert to the Salton Sea region, as well as in Utah and on a small island in British Columbia.  read more...

Tuesday March 6


SHARED VISION: The Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection of Photography
Opening Reception
Aperture Gallery
547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor (Map it)
6-8 PM

Selected from the collection of Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla, Shared Vision features two hundred iconic images, which reflect the rich and diverse nature of the past one hundred years of photography. Street scenes, the human form and environment, unique viewpoints, children, and spectacular landscapes represent just a portion of the amazing holdings amassed by two individuals that Art News ranks among the world’s top ten photo collectors. The exhibition features prominent photographers, including Ansel Adams, Eugène Atget, Margaret Bourke-White, Walker Evans, Loretta Lux, Sally Mann, Doug and Mike Starn, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Alfred Stieglitz.  read more...

Friday March 9


Hey, Hot Shot!  2011 Second Edition Showcase: Photographs by Michael Cappabianca, Phil Jung, Brendan George Ko, Cristina De Middel, and Meike Nixdorf

Opening Reception
Jen Bekman Gallery
6 Spring Street (Map it)
6-8 PM

The Hey, Hot Shot! 2011 Second Edition Showcase presents a diverse selection of contemporary photography from around the globe. Brendan George Ko blends lived experiences with the fantastic to create images that limbo hauntingly between worlds. Michael Cappabianca’s work interprets the physicality and structure of the book as realized within the material world. Photographing what can be observed through the windows of the personal/public space of the car window, Phil Jung discusses the role of the automobile in revealing the social landscape. Meike Nixdorf “orbits” around her mountain subject, exploring the viewing process and the individual nature of pieces
within a whole. Cristina De Middel plays part photojournalist and part story-teller, re-imagining documentation of the failed 1964 Zambian space program.  The photographers in this exhibition were selected from a talented pool of submissions to Hey, Hot Shot!, the international photography competition founded by Jen Bekman.  read more...

Wednesday March 14


Haik Kocharian
Opening Reception
Robin Rice Gallery
325 West 11th Street (Map it)
6-8 PM

Kocharian’s work focuses on the interaction of the individual and the surrounding nature: a forest, body of water or urban street. His style is reminiscent of photojournalism forefathers such as Robert Frank and Cartier-Bresson yet with a Fellini-esque twist. The exhibit includes photographs from Kocharian’s expansive travels – from immersing himself in Montauk during Hurricane Earl to a soul-searching journey to India to a humanitarian trip to Ethiopia.  read more...

Thursday March 15


Laurent Zylberman: A Journey in Tibet
Opening Reception
sous les etoiles - The Gallery
560 Broadway, Suite 205 (Map it)
6-8 PM

After the riots of 14-16 March, 2008, the photographer Laurent Zylberman and the journalist Eric Meyer were among the first westerners authorized to enter in Tibet, a forbidden region under traumatized military guard and armed to the teeth. “We had the desire to place ourselves in the interstices of the economic, social and religious Tibetan society, seize people’s eyes and their relationship with each other revealing a reality they cannot talk about or voluntarily express” said Laurent Zylberman. A Journey in Tibet is a series based on a 15-day mission through “The Top of the World”, between Lhasa, Shigatze, Giangtze and Namso Lake. This photographic journal describes the culture’s vulnerability, allowing us to discover significant internal contradictions of China’s policy for its “autonomous territory.” Each photo solicits strange, unexpected and profound poetry. This awe-inspiring environment in extreme conditions, settled by a very sparse population conveys a feeling of gravity and greatness.  read more...

Jörn Vanhöfen: Aftermath
Opening Reception
Robert Mann Gallery
210 11th Avenue, between 24th and 25th Streets (Map it)
6-8 PM

This exhibition presents large format color photographs from Vanhöfen's recent body of work, Aftermath.  Although his subject is perhaps best characterized as human interventions in the landscape and the structures of civilization, Vanhöfen's images evince a psychological range extending beyond more familiar conceptions of post-New Topographics landscape photography. A peripatetic artist, Vanhöfen travels the world over, arriving at pictures that convey the tumult of the 21st century. Whether the harried trading floor of a Chicago commodities exchange or the humble structures of another era sequestered in the lee of freeway overpasses, Aftermath is sensitively attuned to the complex network of market and social forces. Mining the aesthetic and philosophical legacies of Romanticism, the artist deftly plays on established conventions while updating them to the concerns of the global present.  read more...

Friday March 16


Mitch Epstein: Black and White Photographs
Opening Reception
Sikkema Jenkins & Co.
530 West 22nd Street (Map it)
6-8 PM

Mitch Epstein’s new work features the idiosyncratic trees that populate New York City, underscoring the importance of trees in urban life and their complex relationship with the city’s human dwellers. From Parsons Boulevard, Flushing to Sprague Avenue, Staten Island to Prospect Park, Brooklyn, Epstein returned to photograph the same trees through changing light and seasons. The resulting photographs invert people’s usual view of their city: trees no longer function as background or landscape, but, instead, become the focus of the image, dominating the human life and architecture around them.  Living and working in New York, Mitch Epstein is a pioneer of color photography whose photographs are in New York’s Metropolitan Museum, Museum of Modern Art and Whitney Museum of American Art, the Tate Modern in London, the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others.  read more...

Thursday March 22


Stan Douglas: Disco Angola
Opening Reception
David Zwirner
525 West 19th Street (Map it)
6-8 PM

For this exhibition, titled Disco Angola, Douglas has assumed the fictional character of a photo-journalist, this time a regular in the burgeoning disco underground of the early 1970's New York.  For Douglas's alter-eo, the new scene offered a cathartic respite from urban grittiness in a city on the verge of bankruptcy. Evolving out of funk and soul, the disco lifestyle mobilized the gay community in particular, and its self-conscious embrace of glamour and fashion represented a departure from the previous decade’s counterculture. In parallel, Douglas's alter-ego photographer traveled to Angola to document the civil war there. This exhibition presents four works from Angola and four from New York, revealing subtle parallels between the burgeoning disco culture and Angolan liberation struggles.  Researching archival photographs, period costumes, and decor, Douglas has meticulously recreated “snapshots” from the two locations diagonally separated by the Atlantic Ocean.  read more...

August Sander / Boris Mikhailov: German Portraits
Opening Reception
Pace / MacGill Gallery
32 East 57th Street, 9th Floor (Map it)
5:30 - 7:30 PM

This exhibition juxtaposes twenty 20th century portraits by German cultural documentarian August Sander with ten photographs from Boris Mikhailov's German Portrait series (2008) to examine how two seminal photographers approached the subject of portraiture in Germany, nearly a century apart. August Sander is known as the most significant German photographer of the early 20th century, whose typological approach to the medium was highly influential to artists such as Bernd and Hilda Becher, Andreas Gursky, and Thomas Ruff.  Nearly a century after Sander, Ukrainian-born photographer Boris Mikhailov photographed Germany's middle class with the same uncompromising directness. Exhibited widely since the late 1960's, Mikhailov is considered the foremost photographer of the former Soviet Union.  read more...
Brian Ulrich. Is This Place Great or What: Artifacts and Photographs
Opening Reception
Julie Saul Gallery
535 West 22nd Street, 6th Floor (Map it)
6-8 PM

This exhibition is the culmination of Brian Ulrich's decade-long photographic investigation of American consumerism. It takes a final look back at the last decade and puts America’s retail apparatus in a post-war, historical context. Ulrich juxtaposes his work with various artifacts from an earlier time- selections from a large archive that Ulrich has amassed concurrently with his photographic project. Objects include a restored vintage sign in optimistic italics announcing Fast Food, well before the phrase became a dirty word and America became “supersized.” Furthermore, pre-barcode labels from forgotten products evoke the optimism of Pop and Warhol.  read more...

Friday March 23


Frank Golhke: One Thing and Another
Opening Reception
Howard Greenberg Gallery
41 East 57th Street, Suite 1406 (Map it)
6-8 PM

Frank Golhke is a leading figure in American landscape photography. He has been awarded two Guggenheim Fellowships and two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts. Known for his large format landscape photographs, Gohlke's work has been shown at museums all over the world and included in collections such as the Museum of Modern Art, the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film, the Australian National Gallery and the National Gallery of Canada.  read more... and also read more here...

Thursday March 29


Nick Brandt: On This Earth, A Shadow Falls (Retrospective of best work 2001-2008)
Opening Reception
Hasted Kraeutler 
537 West 24th Street (Map it)
6-8 PM

Nick Brandt's photography bears little relation to the colour documentary-style wildlife photography that is the norm. He photographs on medium-format black and white film without telephoto or zoom lenses. His work is a combination of epic panoramas of animals within dramatic landscapes and graphic portraits more akin to studio portraiture of human subjects from the early 20th Century, as if these animals were already long dead, from a bygone era. Brandt does not use telephoto lenses because he believes that being close to the animals make a huge difference in his ability to reveal their personality. He writes: "You wouldn't take a portrait of a human being from a hundred feet away and expect to capture their spirit; you'd move in close." As American photography critic Vicki Goldberg writes: "Many pictures convey a rare sense of intimacy, as if Brandt knew the animals, had invited them to sit for his camera, and had a prime portraitist's intuition of character...as elegant as any arranged by Arnold Newman for his human high achievers."  read more... and also read more here...

Thursday March 29 to Sunday April 1


Fair: The AIPAD Photography Show 
Park Avenue Armory 643 Park Avenue (Map it)
11 AM to 7 PM (until 6 PM on Sunday)

The AIPAD Photography Show New York is one of the most important international photography art events. More than 75 of the world's leading photography art galleries will present a wide range of museum-quality work, including contemporary, modern and nineteenth-century photographs, as well as photo-based art, video, and new media, at the historic Park Avenue Armory in New York City's Upper East Side. AIPAD has also organized an excellent series of panel discussions to coincide with the show including: Curators Choice: Emerging Artists in Photography and How to Collect Photographs: What Collectors Need to Know Now.  Read more...